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decisions she made as environment minister in the 1990's. a parliamentary committee is looking into mismanagement of a test site to dump nuclear waste. >> critics say merkel authorized tunnels to be dug without going through the proper channels. residents and activists say the site is a public hazard and that radioactive leaks could plague future generations. the chancellor denies having made any errors in selecting the site. >> angela merkel appearing at the parliamentary inquiry. the chancellor is asked to cast her mind back to the mid-1990's when she was environment minister. the opposition claims that merkel and the rest of her party were determined to push through the nation's nuclear dump and that they ignored studies proposing other sites. >> critical scientists have expressed doubts of -- about the site's suitability. the decision to pursue the location was essentially political. >> the chancellor denies those claims, as do other members of her party. some are unable to contain their anger at the opposition. >> we had this experience during this parliamentary inquiry. e
thinking about emotional, financial, social, spiritual, environment, occupational and zerintellectual. because the eight dimensional model of wellness. this is how we conceptualize wellness. care about as a bonus because people are physically sick and many are dying before the general population. we care about intellectual honest because we need help the minds and how the bodies and the knowledge to reclaim and manage or light and recovery. weaker but social wellness because the conditions about social isolation, leading people further from their healthy recovery. we care about spiritual oneness because the disease, all of these diseases robs us of our sense of spiritual connectedness. return about mental and emotional rawness because people need clear, live at mines, in order to live a productive lives and pursue recovery. recurve and marijuana's because it is impossible for people to feel better or well in places -- we care about occupational wellness because we need jobs to fill our days, to give it time and -- we need stable incomes and savings in order to live comfortably and rid
terrorism and organized crime, the protection of the environment, achieving sustainable development, a respect for human rights, and mainly the rights of women, and ensuring the rule of law, fighting against hatred and intolerance. mr. president, libya emphasizes its affiliation to africa, the importance of shipping policies with africa and the world, once which were based in the past on extortion. we want them to be a relation based on a firm interest for the interests of all the people. the new libya dissociates itself from the republic of past and extends a hand in freedom and friendship to initiate new relations, built on mutual respect and fruitful cooperation. in conclusion, excellencies, mr. president, let me wish this session full success in solving the issues on our agenda. i express the hope that the spirit of solidarity and cooperation will prevail in order to create a better world -- one left with security and stability. thank you, and may god's blessings be upon you. [applause] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i wish to tell the president of the dinner -- general n
mar to improve the business environment for foreign companies. it is attractive due to its rapid economic reforms. the chairman of the japan chamber of commence met with an official in the capital. he asked for swifter measures to ensure a stable supply of power. in response the senior official expressed hope for more investments from japan and pledged a better business environment. >>> and that's all for business news for this hour. i'll be back later. but for now a recap of the markets. plged a better business >>> the gaming industry is booming in japan driven by a rampant increase in smartphone users. it faces a serious shortage of programmers. a maker of game software has organized a programmer contest to find talented people. among the contestants were a handful of high school students. >> reporter: 22 finalists gathered in tokyo for the contest earlier this month. all of them are students. the total prize money is about $13,000. this is one of three high school students who are taking part. the three are competing against undergraduate and graduate school students. he becam
on top of a recessionary environment is a toxic mix. >> the ecb saying spanish bank deposits down 1.1% on the month in august, which means they're now the lowest level since april 2008. and we've got a prime minister there who has effectively said to the markets come out and short me because we're not going to go for a bailout unless webo costs go higher. and he's trying to delay aid until after the catalonia elections. and that seems like a pretty thin tight rope to walk. loan i. >> and we'll get the report on just how much money the banks need. it is suspected it will be in the 60 billion plus. but the elections on october 21st, that's rajoy's own province. and then you have the cat lo loaniloa loanian region think they're the richest region giving too much to the others. the rest of the region has seen a dramatic change. during the good times, they had revenue. from the developers, people buying properties, now that's all going and they're left from the legacy. from cat loan i can't to the canaries, you name it, all of these places, they're all struggling.alonia to the canari you
where you can find opportunity. >> everybody's looking for yield in an environment where we can't find any. rick, what are you seeing there today? >> you had a great point. everybody's looking for yields, so everybody needs to take more risk. that's the plan. the problem is, when you take more risk to get more reward, you have more risk. you know, take the word austerity and throw it out. use the word reform. one guest just said central bankers are doing all the heavy lifting. because the heavy lifting for them is easy. print, print, print, print. the real hard part is the reform the politicians need to get these economies vibrant. it's not going to be easy. that's why it looks like it's gridlock. it looks like it's fighting. in the end, it's because there isn't one easy magic wand solution. >> sure, sure. you could call it reform, michelle. you could call it austerity. you can call it cup cakes. i don't know what you want to call t but it hurts. >> the difference matters, right? here's what we found in greece. they don't want to do reforms. they don't want to break the companies in co
, if anything, a deflationary environment right now, the inflation hedge, the inflation premium that you get from gold is going down. is that why the price is down? >> yeah. that's not going to last. um, you know, let's think about what's going on right now. we've got europe possibly falling apart, and we've got -- and the euro barely moving on that news. and you've got ben bernanke printing money. you know, i don't think that -- i think we got a little frothy on some of these commodity prices. look for them to form a bottom here and to start getting a bid. i think gold is going to start rallying here shortly along with soy, wheat and probably beef and pork. david: i tend to agree with you on gold anyway because the cb doesn't seem to be slowing down, and whether we like it or not, the fed's going to be printing money -- >> right. >> as long as we're getting free money from bernanke, i like to joke, gold's going to rally. i'm looking for $1800 an ounce relatively soon. but, you know, i think the real interesting thing is the s&p. we've got spain falling apart, and secession talk, and we've o
trying to deal with inflationary figures. the environment is different. we just can't take all of that and apply it widely. reporter: created by the elections in and the fiscal clip at the end of the year, also the debt crisis mirror. cheryl: all right, peter burns, thank you very much. if you are fired up about this or any other issues on the program, send gerri an e-mail at cherry at fox business.com. >> coming up on "the willis report", an electric car that nobody wants to purchase. we spend billions of dollars on your dime. and housing cop and sent prices skyrocketing. would this mean for the market? also, remember when free checking accounts were almost everywhere? not anymore. our financial advisor breaks down what it's costing you and ally bank. why they're always there to talk. i love you, james. don't you love me? i'm a robot. i know. i know you're a robot! but there's more in you than just circuits and wires! uhhh. (cries) a machine can't give you what a person can. that's why ally has knowledgeable people there for you, night and day. ally bank. your money needs an a
environment we're leaving in this is structural. when president obama walked in real unemployment was 20%, it is now 17 that is not acceptable. neil: what it the mantra, the trend is our friend. they are moving in direct we would like, is that enough to hang a reelection hat on? >> i think it is when paul ryan sits out there as a fiscal conservative with specificity. the jargon of the day is everyone is now supposed to be a fiscal conservative, but paul ryan as we know is specific to what that means. you talk about throughout the nation, social security, medicare. neil: you like him? >> i think he as an opponent for this administration, absolutely. neil: why have they not used to charlie gasparino's point, more of him. >> he does not sell well after the pick. in terms -- >> what you say about medicare, and entitlement rubs people the wrong way. >> the wrong way on peh pehl grs and head start. neil: i think general voter the right way, someone is saying truth full stuff, he is hardly godzilla. >> but coupled with the big issue of an independent block, and a big issue for women, as to whet
figures. the environment is different. we just can't take all of that and apply it widely. reporter: created by the elections in and the fiscal clip at the end of the year, also the debt crisis mirror. cheryl: all right, peter burns, thank you very much. if you are fired up about this or any other issues on the program, send gerri an e-mail at cherry at fox business.com. >> coming up on "the willis report", an electric car that nobody wants to purchase. we spend billions of dollars on your dime. and housing cop and sent prices skyrocketing. would this mean for the market? also, remember when free checking accounts were almost everywhere? not anymore. our financial advisor breaks down what it's costing you and if the services are gone for good. we are on the case next on "willis report" rachel quit the corporate grind to start her own interior design business. she's got a growing list of clients she keeps in touch with using e-mail marketing from constantcontact.com. constantcontact is easy and affordable. it lets her send out updates and photos that showcase her expertise and inspir
there are byproducts. one is low kreeyields. >> regulators keep saying because of the low yield environment, buy more bonds because they now have a pension deficit. that's nonsense, of course. what's happening on the corporate side? they're awash with capital. are we also getting less issuance and how much more money do corporates need to have? >> what's interesting is the eurozone credit market is shrinking year on year which is the first time it's done that for a long time. there's not only less issuance, there's less coming out to meet, retiring effectively. corporates as kelly said earlier, the economic outlook is not rosy. the motivation to carry out m&a activities is relatively low. so i expect the trend to continue. >> and the quality they're issuing isn't all that great either. >> the good quality have all the cash they need. so, you know, they don't need any who are. >> most of them have the cash. i think the good quality borrowers can borrow really easier. there's huge 2k3457demand for h the spreads are tight. >> angela merkel and mario draghi are both delivering speeches in berlin today. o
to stimulate cargo. the cargo has to be there from the manufacturers and from the general economic environment. but next year, the car go industry might pick up a little bit. the conditions for cargo are still very bad now. but again, overall the industry of course is still more passenger than cargo. and it's been a bit of a double whammy this year because for the long call carriers operating out of asia, they're heavily exposed to markets like europe where there's been an impact. >> are we going get anymore meaningful consolidation? i don't see eus saying to america you should really allow for proper mergers between european and u.s. airlines. do you think that's ever going it to be allowed? >> there's still a lot of steps to be taken to allow that to happen. true global consolidation, a lot of countries still have policies that limit foreign investment in the airline sector. so we need to see a lot of changes in the regulatory environment to allow that to happen. in the meantime, we did see a lot of consolidation continue to happen within regions like latin america, like north america, like
and retail business are rising. and also in some lines of the industrial business. so the overall environment for the insurance industry is very good. your free float is about 20%. will you stop here for a while or will you raise money in the future? >> we'll raise money in the future, however, not for the next 24 months. we are sufficiently capitalized now after this ipo on for the next 24 months, but there will be further capital increases in the future. this is just our first step in to becoming a listed insurance company. >> all right. and just give us your view where we stand at the moment with the world economy. because it's interesting where you're looking at your operations. eurozone still in the grips of recession or low growth, weaker growth in asia. just give us your sense of how you view the world and how it transfers back into your business. >> i'm 100% sure that the euro will survive. the euro is instrumental for the future of europe. the emerging market particularly in brazil and mexico are very interesting growing markets for the future. and also the middle and eastern europea
says an employer has to provide a safe working environment, and if they don't provide a safe working environment -- which is really what the refs are there to do first and foremost, to keep the players safe -- then that union is empowered to watch over the resolution of that problem. and so far the coaches' and players' unions have held their tongues and not gotten involve with the this ref dispute. cheryl: you know, if you look at the amount of bets that were lost, especially on the packers' game, we're talking $150 million, granted some booking agencies are actually refunding because they say, look, the proof is what you saw on television. at the same time, though, do you this think that this is going to make the owners look bad because they're the ones that have so much of a financial stake in all this, they're the ones that are losing if their team loses based on a bad call? >> yeah. i think what're seeing now -- what we're seeing now is some tension among the owners because they realize they're damaging the nfl brand, and it's a brand that's been respected. it's roger goodell's
and solutions. and again with the complicated regional and international environment, we have to be very, very careful. we are drawing down of two wars in the middle east, in iraq and afghanistan than many would say at the very least in terms of success and some would characterize as failures, especially into the future. so they have to be very, very careful about interjecting our source. frankly perhaps ultimately if this uprising unworn syria basically can be contained. there needs to be a syrian solution to this. as i said earlier, many of the syrian opposition are as pro-u.s. anyone else's career. we have to be careful about these things. and i think we just can't throw our weight around. as much as we would like to. as much as there seems to be a moral imperative to do so, we don't understand the landscape. we are getting a better idea, but the opposition is so decentralized. there is no coherent group, you know, we could support that we be as i said earlier shooting in the dark to some degree. you know, what would happen in terms of the worst across borders or hezbollah. why would russia
business decisions being made as a result of the uncertainty in the macro environment. >> the dow up 10%. the s&p 500 up nearly 500. nasdaq up nearly 20%. the dax up 25. pretty nice gains. at the beginning of the year, you would have taken all of those for the year, right? >> certainly. the reason being, actually stocks and corporates are generally in this economic crisis that we're seeing around the western world are the safe haven. you don't want exposure to governments. you don't want exposure to consumers. the corporates can manage their cost base. they can move where the demand is much more freely than say consumers can and governments can. so at the moment, money's got to go somewhere and it's hard to get too bearish on equities, given the yields and actually how demand is holding up for these organizations. >> that's what you were talking about, where else that money might go. so look, for example, at corporate credit where we've seen such an inflow into high yield. we've seen high yield returning in the range of 17% this year. so if you look into next year when it already looks
what moody's does in this environment, where actually we're discussing whether there will be intervention on the ecb? >> first of all, i think it is very relevant because this would bring spain's rating down to junk levels, which is the lowest of all three rating agencies, so it's a pretty big deal. and then the ecb program can't be implemented until spain actually says they want help. so it depends what happens first. i think it's going to be a slippery slope. finally, we've got the budget coming up tomorrow. there are more painful cuts, it could mean more pain for spain and more pain for the euro. >> there's a lot of tifs in tha. >> you could also argue that all the central banks have been ineffective in generating momentum in the markets right now. so even if they're persistently buying, it's really about risk appetite and sentiment. i don't think there's enough there. central banks could come in and make another announcement, but i think having just made these unprecedented announcements, that that could lead to firefighting. >> what are you targeting? >> lo
. so there is -- it's a very skittish, very fragile environment. >> yeah. obviously, the q2 gdp numbers are old, a little dusty here, but they do not show any acceleration which is what we're trying to find clues to in the back half of the of the year. >> i think what happened is europe had a much bigger effect on business sentiment than many people thought. it's been dampening exports and capital spending which is what the durables reflect. as we moved through the summer and stabilized on europe, normally we might get some acceleration. the problem frou is you have the fiscal cliff and the election. people now have yet another excuse not to do anything. had europe not bled into the summer as long as it did, maybe you'd have gotten that spark in activity. but right now you just don't have it. >> are you taking a lot of solace in what housing's done, what confidence is doing? >> yeah, the housing numbers i think are great. that's one of the reasons the economy hasn't been strong to this point in the cycle. housing is keeping us from really stuttering on growth. we need more in housing, a
of the more mature companies. >> what matters is if you create an environment for people to invest in the united states. the last several administrations i went to washington if intel is going to build this next major manufacturing facility the net present value of the facility in a u.s. compared to a lower corporate tax environment is $ billion. it's a tough sell to be patriotic and have that facility in the u.s. cut the corporate tax rate down to a competitive level. i think technology will continue to advance. the problem is keeping the good ideas in the u.s. and create jobs. >> it can happen in spite of things or you can help or be sort of in the way? >> or you can facilitate for an economy which is growing. what we do with foreign graduate students, taxpayer money pays to educate them to get thai masters and ph.d.s and tech topics and our immigration policy says go home. it's a brilliant philosophy. >> you said the growth in intel will be abroad. whatever the tax policy is, i imagine you have to go abroad on manufacturing and engineering. you want to go to the customer. even i
are taking risks. >> oh, sure, in this environment, i mean, you know, we're watching liquidity like a hawk because there's great sense tomorrow morning it could go the other way, in effect you don't invest as much, you don't take as much risk. >> how would you counter the argument that businesspeople and the wealthy have had their way for the past 2030-years as they've increased their lead in terms of income disparity and gotten richer and richer, and you would have hoped that some of that would have trickled down, if it works you would have hoped the average person would have participated in the good times and haven't and you need a president that is going to come in for the powerless people that aren't able to set policy and pay to go do things and you need someone that will represent them in the future. how was is that pretty damned good? >> yes, sir. >> you can take this. thank you for writing it for me. >> i'll get you a job at "the new york times." the reality is as follows. the whole focus has been on how the quote, one percenters or ten percenters, how the top earners moved ahead o
producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> welcome back. we have weakness on wall street today. about 30 minutes left before the closing bell sounds. the dow jones industrial average down about 38 points in the home stretch. more from mary thompson. >> just about seven points above the lows of the day for the dow jones industrial average, pressured by europe. we want to highlight one group. you heard seema talking about some of the bounce back and the big tech names earlier today. the tech sector was the weakest performer among the ten we follow. energy right now has taken that slot. turning around in large part because we've seen a turn around in hewlett-packard. they've come off
in this environment. how do you do it when we see the fundamentals are not keeping up with some of this market performance? >> it's a real challenge. the private client was tremendously traumatized by the financial crisis and spooked by technology glitches and continuing scandals in the marketplace. they still don't trust that if they put their money in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, it's going to grow in value over time. we've been encouraging them in as many ways as we can to move out of cash, move out of bonds, which they perceive as safe but have their own risks, into at least a benchmark waiting in equities. the problem is all through this year you've had overhanging uncertainty in the marketplace. first, u.s. economic growth, china, european sovereign debt crisis. those have been replaced right now by, as you've mentioned, fiscal cliff and debt ceiling negotiations. the investor is confused about where to go, but those investors who stayed in cash missed this rally that we've had this year. they shouldn't make that mistake again. >> are you saying don't stay in cash? you want to get on thi
to fatal work injuries -- these are bls figures. exposure to harmful substances or environment. 9% of injuries have fatal work injuries due to what the caller was talking about guest: -- talking about. guest: that is right. although it, these aren't just injuries. -- these are just injuries. the we do not look at illnesses. host: so that would not be included. guest: that would not be included. and and lives will have a long latency period typically, so we're looking at a key events. -- acute events. the things you see on this chart are things that happen immediately. it is some kind of violence or fall or contact with equipment. host: exposure to harmful substance would be a one time event? could that include a berndt? guest: it could. we have fires and explosions. a burn would more likely fall into that category. host: when you see the commercials for asbestos and our practice, etc., with asbestos exposure -- exposure be included in the bls statistics? guest: generally not. that will be a latency issue. we only look at immediate injuries. we're looking at something over a short
think the environment's different. so we just can't take all that evidence and apply it blindly. i think it has diminishing returns. and frankly while we have some evidence that interest rates decline we don't know they were permanent. people argue it was transitory and we don't really directly observe the impact on employment and output. >> we did see some economic indicators today, i was talking to you before we came on camera because during the your speech we got the release of consumer confidence was up substantially in the month of september, in part on people feeling better about their job prospects. about higher stock prices. you know, the so-called wealth effect would help make people feel wealthier, invest, they would spend more. what do you make of that, and -- >> well, i mean, if consumer confidence went up, i think generally that's a good thing. that is usually a good indicator of things to come but, you know, i think we have to be careful about reading too much into the entrails here what sort of actually caused it or not. i do think we have to be careful, i am not a big fan
with a diverse group of needs. what is it you offer? an easy regulatory environment? educated workforce? low tax rate? what is your main draw? >> to be successful you have to do it all and we are focusing on all those things. we built on technology. texas instruments was one of the founding fathers and when you build a city on technology that happens. when we have the f.w. airport when you get any place in the nation very quickly the third busiest airport in the world, it helps a lot and city hall we make sure we get things in and out and make decisions and don't get caught up in a lot of bureaucracy. try to minimize that as much as we can. melissa: some things to highlight. you have a budget surplus of $2.3 million and that has to do with property tax base because home values did not go down -- go up or down as much. they have been stable. over the next five years you see 12.8% job growth ranking number 4 nationally. the biggest category you are going to add 127,000 professional and business service jobs. who should come to dallas looking to find a job? >> at at&t, move from san antonio and att
the findings from qe1 and think we will get the same effects. i think the environment is different. you cannot take all that evidence and a flight it. >> we will have the fed chairman remarks live on fox business at 12:30 p.m. there will be plenty of questions on inflation, economic conditions, when the fed starts pulling back on monetary policy, still many questions regarding qe3. connell: rich, thank you very much. all that uncertainty that surrounds our economy could be what leads us back into recession. brian was perry joins us now. he has been optimistic about the economy. >> i did not disagree with one word he just said to dagen and fewer viewers. he is absolutely right. the government is too big. we have all of these taxes to worry about if we do not cut spending. it has become the biggest financial institution in the world and that is why we are more worried today about uncertainty and what has happened is the risk reward ratio has changed for business. there is more risk and potentially a lot less rewards. businesses are holding back and that increases the odds of recession. the three
monitor the environment and assess threats and take action as warranted." >>shepard: thank you, rich, from washington, dc. strict budget cuts in greece have had tens of thousands of people rioting in the streets. the violent demonstration is the biggest in many months. cops say those are gasoline bombs that protesters are hurling at officers. riot police responded to the rounds of tear gas. they are angry over budget cuts that the european finance officials demanded in exchange for the multibillion dollar greece bailout. police in phoenix, at home, say a 39-year-old self described filmmaker recorded a video where a teen, his nephew, posed as a terrorist holding what looked like a rocket propelled grenade. here is the video. the kid in the costume is 16. the weapon is a fake. the so-called filmmaker shot the video eight days after the colorado movie massacre to see how fast police would react to the teen posing as a terrorist with a weapon. >> as we approached our actor appeared at threatening as possible but went unnoticed. our actor paced the crosswalk to draw as much attention as possibl
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, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. to start her own interior design business. she's got a growing list of clients she keeps in touch with using e-mail marketing from constantcontact.com. constantcontact is easy and affordable. it lets her send out updates and photos that showcase her expertise and inspire her customers for only $15 a month. [ dog barking ] her dream -- to be the area's hottest interior design office. [ children laughing ] right now, she just dreams of an office. get a free trial at constantcontact.com. >>> we're back in tonight's outer circle where we reach out to our sources around the world and we begin in athens where demonstrators clashed with police. tens of thousands showed up. the bigg
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is not providing the type of security that is necessary in the environment that we are in. i don't think there's anybody who in congress or the senate that can articulate what this presidenting apolicy is post-gadhafi in libya. he didn't articulate it when he began the military action and certainly isn't now leaving americans at risk. >> thank you for your time. i think it is, to be fair to the administration and there's obviously two republican members of congress. i mean, it's not clear how much the u.s. was in control of events. there were events happening around the world and events were happening in libya and the streets of egypt without the u.s. being in the forefront of it. and in many cases the u.s. was reacting, as often happens in foreign policy. the arab spring is not something the u.s. necessarily has control over. >> that's right, anderson. we have to understand that. that said, our experience tells us whether it is the bombings or the "uss cole." in yemen, libya, because of a weak central government -- we know al qaeda has the wherewithal to take advantage of that and they look f
candidate sort of feel the words and the environment before you really put them to the test. part is about building confidence and helping someone work their way into their stride. so i think typically yes you're running through those questions and then you're kind of up on your feet. and then you go from there. you rework the questions. you see how you're presenting piece by piece. it all comes together. >> jennifer: how important is this debate prep for president obama because romney has been debating a lot this year. just real quickly. >> i think it's very important. this is the highest influxion moment of any campaign, particularly a presidential campaign. and so he's pretty good on his feet but again every answer is a minute and a half. you have to be hone and sharp and get your few points across that will then be covered by the media and form the broader public's opinion of what happened. >> jennifer: exactly. so interesting. i'll be watching. great popcorn moment. that's democratic strategist jill alpe
media matters less. they have less of a control of the environment. a lot of people are writing it off. sometimes breath-taking to see. >> i don't know if msnbc fits my description of main stream media but a contradiction of what you said. you said they have a smaller audience which is true but on the other hand the bias might affect the campaign. if the audience for the main stream media smaller, the network and big newspapers presumably it's having less impact on public opinion. >> it is also controlling where the campaign goes. and the climate it creates. >> bret: put up polls, number five. news organization spending more time defending president obama and attacking romney 47%. romney attacking obama 16%. 21% on the next one, focusing on the presidential candidates or the news coverage, silly, serious issues. there you see the split. the news coverage silly issues dominating. charles, you thoughts? >> the role of the media is auxiliary of the obama campaign and they should relocate to chicago and save travel time. if you look at the specific issues and how they're covered, for examp
in that environment? is it too unstable of an environment for effective security exercise to continue? your thoughts on that. >> i appreciate that question. in 2001, i voted to authorize use of mill tear force in afghanistan. in the days and months following the nen attacks on the united states. it was a very clear and focused megs to go after those who planned and executed that attack. and i believe our brave men and women who went to afghanistan, very capably fulfilled that mission, frankly in fairly short order. i was in afghanistan in august of 2010, in kabul and at bagram air force base. i met with wisconsin soldiers and -- soldiers and folks in the military from the senior ranks to the tissue to those coming back from forward operating bases. you would be so proud of those men and women, but the mission today this nation building mission, is not the one that was authorized. it is now time for them to come home. >> governor thompson? >> my opponent just, i think, misstated. she said she voted for the sanctions against iran. she voted against the sanctions in 2006, 2009, and 2010 and in august s
mass-oriented environments where it's pegboard and they point you to aisle four, go find it yourself. we've done research that shows in certain categories, especially foundation, the consumer shop en masse, she spends more than when she buys in prestige where she buys in the store to the exact match foundation. the value proposition is around service which is why in this market, in north america, very high percentage of the total beauty business that's done in prestige like macy's because of that service proposition and a relatively low, absolute value differential in the price point. >> we continue to see companies go in and have difficulty in china. one company told us last week that western companies are going into china with western views about the chinese consumer and their loyalty and they're finding that that consumer passes them by in different ways. are there lessons you've already figured out on that front? >> we've been doing business in asia for 30, 40 years. and we first started in japan in the early '70s, then expanded into korea and hong kong. we've been in china doing
to the environment to taxation. elected state officials and corporate representatives close the door to press and public and to gather, approved the bills that will be sent out to america. americans have no idea they come from alec unless someone l exposes it. >> when i went to the alec convention last august, i remember going to a workshop and hearing a little bit about a bill they did in florida and some other states. there is a proposal to provide special need scholarships. i come back to wisconsin and what gets introduced was to write get ready. i know you have a shocked look. a bill to do just that. >> 26 alec members in wisconsin legislators sponsored the special needs bill, but the real sponsor was alec. the bill bore a striking resemblance to alec's model. have a look. >> he is not concerned that only alec's since bills into the state legislature. >> some of the legislation sounds so immaculate. when you read about why they're doing it, and another is a far different reason why something is coming forth and that is important the average person and, if they knew that a bill like this f
. obviously a low-interest environment, what is another point you want to make? i have been following them for years. >> there of 15% so they have done well. they are benefiting from lower interest rates to a 220 year low. credit spreads are tightening too so cost of money coming down but more importantly commercial real estates are very strong. very little construction activity in the 2012 period. where we are today is demand greater than supply so rent is going up for many property types in many parts of the country. the average yield is 3.3% so investors are looking for a little in come. cheryl: you talk about the fact that people are moving into apartments and things like that because you have hotel and health care and old folks and the apartment buildings. looking at your top holdings, simon property. biggest name in the business. >> a large holding in the index and a fund. stocks have done well this year. and they do have discretionary money to spend and nordstrom or what have you but they participated in the economy of the last year or two so they have been benefiting and they have
, and resilient cyber environment. we must work internationally because the cyber criminals do not respect traditional national boundaries. attacks can and do to emanate from any place around the world. last may the united states released a new international strategy for cyberspace to help provide a blueprint for building an international framework to make sure cyberspace more secure and reliable. much remains to be done in this area, as the need for sustained international engagement becomes more apparent every day. as much as we have done, there's still a lot of work to do, because of threats to cybersecurity are real, serious, and the eve of rapidly. together we can and we must maintain a cyberspace that is safe and resilience that remains a source of tremendous opportunity and growth for years to come. to that end, we need to work more effectively with the private sector to tackle the difficult challenges -- first, real time information sharing between the public and private sectors, and second, whiter adoption of cybersecurity best practices for the nation's critical infrastructure. i
. that's what's good about this environment. >> that would seem to suggest a floor on this market, erin. do you feel like we are seeing wear and tear in this rally? would you take profits here? what are you doing? >> no, we still believe in buying. there's still value out there. there's still obviously strong stocks. one thing i would say is we're definitely more biased towards u.s. equities versus european still, even with the ecb announcement. >> in terms of the vulnerable parts of this market, larry, do you see any? >> well, i think there's -- for one thing, if you look at what's going on in china, they are gradually shifting away from investment spending and construction and toward the consumer. for example, we like the energy more than we like the materials. so i think that is one thing that we're looking at in terms of sectors. health care looks very cheap, although with good reason given all the regulatory uncertainty here with the election coming up. yeah, so that's basically it. >> all right. thanks, everybody. we appreciate it. see you soon. we're in the final stretch here. ju
in such a media-rich and digitally-rich and experience-rich environment now that it's-- it's made my job in some ways easier because what they bring into the classroom is really complex and interesting and it's my job to kind of harness that energy and that enthusiasm and direct it toward the things that i need them to learn as far as being 21st century communicators and thinkers and problem solvers. >> suarez: you often hear that teachers can tell who's going to have trouble in high school early on. in the earlier grades. do you agree with that? and is there anything else teachers can be doing in those early grades to help those kids out? >> i think what-- the best teachers are are seekers. we are given a family's child to teach. we're given their most precious resource, their child. and our job is to send them out better than when they walk through the door. and better doesn't necessarily mean that they can ace a standardized test. better means that i have seen deep within each child what his or her unique potential is. and so great teachers give assignments that are seeking to find that resou
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